WINDSWEPT

Wind-Swept – Fukinagashi :
This style describes a tree that seems affected by strong winds twisting and shaping from one direction, this style is based on trees found high on a mountain top or on an ocean shoreline, The windswept characteristic can be applied to a number of the basic styles, including informal upright, slanting, and semi-cascade. Multi-tree bonsai can also be developed with elements of the windswept style.
-Advantages of windswept style are that it gives a very natural view and one that we see very often in nature. Anybody who has walked a coastal shoreline or a rocky mountain ridge has seen windswept trees; this is the exact image we are trying to replicate. In art design implied line is a very important tool in creating a piece of artwork that draws the viewer into negative space, opening the presentation. If we create windswept bonsai with this idea in mind, viewers will think and believe the tree was grown in 100 mph winds under harsh elements. But in reality it has been grown and maintained with intent.
-Disadvantage of windswept style is the very aspects that make it appealing. Any branch bud or leaf that grows in the wrong direction disrupts the idea of implied line. We have to stay true to the idea of harsh unrelenting wind, which sometime calls for removal of large branches. When choosing this style don’t be afraid to experiment, wind is very strong and will expose roots or even knock trees over, which still have enough root system in the ground to survive.
Any tree species of tree is suitable for windswept style.

 Ficus
 Japanese Zelkova
 Brush Cherry
 Beech
 Crab Apple
 Pomegranate
 Olive
 Conifers
 Japanese White Pine
 Black Pine
 Ponderosa Pine
 Juniper
 Spruce

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